Posts Tagged 'Parenting'

Parental White Privilege Does Benefit Interracial Adoptees

Parental White Privilege Does Benefit Interracial Adoptees

Last week, an article in the Huffington Post http://huff.to/1I0A0fj To The Lady Who Called my Toddler a Thug, written by Rachel Garlinghouse, a white mother who adopted a black boy, got my attention. Particularly because of her concern that her little boy, just because of his appearance was, innocently and not so innocently stereotyped by people whom she knew. It’s the US, I thought, and it’s a dangerous, racialized ...

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Women’s History Month, My Way ~ Part 3: Florita Tully

Women’s History Month, My Way ~ Part 3: Florita Tully

On Saint Patrick’s Day, as my son’s name is Patrick, I decided to honor his grandmother, my mother-in-law, whom I loved most dearly. I wrote this essay for her when she was 102. When time came for her to accept that her only son would choose a black girl as his wife, I never heard any negative comments. Florita accepted me and Patrick fully and unconditionally into the fold of her family. And that was remarkable in the 1970’s upstate New ...

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Women’s History Month: Part 2: Honoring The Mother I Loved.

Women’s History Month: Part 2: Honoring The Mother I Loved.

In the past few blogs I’ve written about wanting to love my birth mother Rosa, a woman I did not get to know. The mother who raised me, however, I knew and loved dearly.

She was 50 when she decided to keep me. her name was Esther, but I called her Mutti, for she was German. She was born in 1888, while Queen Victoria still ruled in England. Picture being raised by a Victorian woman! I could ...

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The Beauty of Having African Hair

The Beauty of Having African Hair

These days I’m again going through the paces again with my hair. By that I mean: now that it’s more gray and white than black, I’m trying to figure out what to do with all the gray kinks and curls. I wish I had the nerve to just go “natural” the way younger women are doing. I’m also fascinated by the way African women have for centuries worked their hair. Look at novelist Chimamanda Adichie Ngozi’s many styles! Here she is in my ...

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Dreams of my Birthmother Rosa

Dreams of my Birthmother Rosa

 

In writing my recent book, Split at the Root: A Memoir of Love and Lost Identity (Kindle) or Split at the Root: A Memoir of Love and Lost Identity, I tell the story of growing up within a culture and a race that was different to my own. Here’s an excerpt:

The night I finished reading Jamaica Kincaid’s Annie John, the wind blowing outside my window ushered messages into my dreams.

I was Annie John, and had ...

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Want to know what the British boarding school in Jamaica was like?

Want to know what the British boarding school in Jamaica was like?

In writing my recent book, Split at the Root: A Memoir of Love and Lost Identity (Kindle) or Split at the Root: A Memoir of Love and Lost Identity, I tell the story of growing up within a culture and a race that was different to my own. Here’s an excerpt:

Established in 1858 and perched on a wide hilly expanse, the school was a dominating U-shaped two-story construction. I don’t know what I was expecting, but the minute I ...

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Want to know what the first time being among Black people felt like?

Want to know what the first time being among Black people felt like?

Off to Jamaica,1955In writing my recent book, Split at the Root: A Memoir of Love and Lost Identity (Kindle) or Split at the Root: A Memoir of Love and Lost Identity, I tell the story of growing up within a culture and a race that was different to my own. Here’s an excerpt:

My German mother and I boarded a busy ...

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So you’d like to know how Mutti’s tales of the Pfalz seduced me?

So you’d like to know how Mutti’s tales of the Pfalz seduced me?

Off to Jamaica,1955In writing my recent book, Split at the Root: A Memoir of Love and Lost Identity (Kindle) or Split at the Root: A Memoir of Love and Lost Identity, I tell the story of growing up within a culture and a race that was different to my own. Here’s an excerpt:

I was passing by Vati’s room one afternoon; we still ...

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Happy Memories of an Adopted Child

Happy Memories of an Adopted Child

Those who seek to adopt and those who have adopted don’t want to read about unsuccessful adoption stories or hear from adult adoptees who are at odds with their fate of having been given up for adoption. It’s easy to understand why that’s so. After all, parenting is the one science for which there are no guidelines. My childhood, as the only black pearl among white ones in Guatemala City, was undoubtedly a happy one.

Going to town ...

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August: Month of Transitions

August: Month of Transitions

White flower arrangementIt’s August: the month where days leading up to my birthday later in the month are days of remembrance for all those dear to me, with the exception of my beloved Fred, transitioned out of this plane… in August. On August 9, many years ago, my mother Rosa passed, and three years ago, on August 8 it was Ruth’s turn. I ...

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